When we talk about the history of visual effects we tend to take digital for granted, yet this transition occurred in our lifetime. Scott Ross is an industry pioneer, from his time at ILM, to founding Digital Domain, he was at the center of the birth of the digital age of visual effects. In our fxpodcast this week we talk with Scott about ILM as they moved from optical effects to digital, creating Digital Domain, and the state of the visual effects business today.

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10 thoughts on “fxpodcast: Scott Ross”

  1. Hello FX Guide.

    I would like to mention that I am a fan of your podcast (both audio and video) and I would like to thank you for making these available. I find the information provided on your podcast to be very enlightening and a great point of reference for the industry.

    This particular podcast with Scott Ross I found most insightful. A lot of the views Scott Ross has about the state of the industry mirror my own; such as artist often not being compensated properly for the work they produce and how they need to stand up for themselves. Scott’s insights on the major studios also refreshing.

    I wish all the best for FX Guide and Scott Ross in the future. I look forward to the next podcast.

    Paul

  2. thanks alot for this VERY great podcast … It was interesting hearing Scotts story – and specially his view on the industry as it’s today. Would love to see more of this industry and business side stories from you guys at FXguide.

    cheers
    jonas

  3. Brilliant conversation. Scott Ross is really really on top of the core issues in this industry. People need to listen to what he says about Pixar vs ILM. Genius.

  4. Excellent interview. I think Scott Ross is the only person that could lead a VFX Guild.

    1) He can be neutral between the big 5 facilities.
    2) He is a known individual amongst the studio brass.
    3) He knows the issues we face first hand.

    If the big 5 could stop eating themselves alive and unite, I am pretty sure the smaller studios (like mine) would fall in step and we could save whatever is left of our industry. Right now it’s a race to the bottom.

    I would like to see a VFX Guild that could have a seat at the table with the DGA and start establishing some policies. That’s something that I would be willing to pay money for as an facility owner.

    1. Thanks David….

      If I could get the unwavering support of the big 5 (or now 8, counting the big facilities in the UK)… I would relish the opportunity to become the “Jack Valenti” of the VFX industry.

      Cheers,
      Scott

      1. I think it would actually be a benefit to the studios because this would give some stability to our industry rather than seeing facilities have to shut down
        in the middle of a show. The problem seems to stall at the point of getting
        the right people to sit down at the table. Seems like a guild would need to start with a set of simple issues that all can agree upon, and succeed with.
        And gradually build upon those policies to gain support and recognition.

        Maybe with the help of other organizations, like the DGA, support could be found? VFX Supervisors are more and more tasked with 2nd Unit Director responsibilities, it seems like it would be good fit, and would get us a seat
        “at the table”.

        And with that it’s back to finaling shots…Thanks for the reply,

        -david

  5. Hell yes Scott Ross! These ridiculously huge vfx epics must end. They leave the creators (vfx people) empty and wandering. I would love to see an 11th hour complete walkout on a blockbuster $300million film. It would not hurt anyone if they ALL walked out – it would instead send the message – “We are done” – FINAL

    1. Correction: It would absolutely hurt all parties involved… but at least we’d get it over with… right now… vfx is withering away in a lose/lose proposition. A few of the big studios probably should fall, scattering their talented cores through the vfx universe like a supernova… a natural rebirth of the “stuff” that makes content. I also agree that a VFX Guild was needed 10-15 years ago.

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