Mike Seymour, Mark Christiansen and Matt Wallin convene from three corners of the globe to discuss Transformers: Dark of the Moon.

In this fxguide interview we talked to Digital Domain visual effects supervisor Matthew Butler about his team’s 350 shots for Transformers: Dark of the Moon. Responsible for the characters Laserbeak, Brains, Wheels and the Decepticon protoforms hiding out on the moon, views of the space bridge, as well as the elaborate Bird Men skydiving sequence, Digital Domain handled all of the shots in stereo for the film and Digital Domain’s sister company, In-Three, handled some of the 3D conversion.

Show Notes:

Director: Michael Bay
Cinematographer: Amir M. Mokri
VFX Supervisors and Visual Effects Companies:
Scott Farrar -- ILM
Matthew Butler -- Digital Domain
Bhakti Patwardhan -- Prana Studios
Scott Squires -- Legend 3D

Michael Bay Talks ‘Transformers: Dark of the Moon’ Story & 3D

Leonard Nimoy

Katie Holmes

Forrest Gump (1994)

John Knoll's scientifically accurate recreation of the Apollo 11 moon landing

Ben Snow

Scott Squires

Erik Roner - Wingsuit BASE Jump Switzerland

Cave of Forgotten Dreams


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  • Tom martinek

    Hey guys, I was the sequence supervisor on the building collapse sequence at ILM and I just wanted to say it was great to hear your review of our work. It WAS an extremely difficult sequence to work on. We only had a small number of TD’s who could work on it since it required such an enormous amount of resources to manage Some of those shots used up to 48 Gigs of memory and took 45 minutes just to load the scenes. Each shot was rendered in (for the most part) a single pass in Mental Ray with full raytracing (there’s a LOT of glass in there :). We took great advantage of the multi channel EXR format to output mattes for almost everything you could imagine. It was a real team effort to get this one done and everyone at ILM went “above and beyond” to help make it happen.